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we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello and welcome to "newsday". >> i;''m babita sharma. lawmakers in britain will discuss the phone hacking scandal rocking news international. the court said they were partly to blame for the shevardnadze massacre. >> japan is to conduct tests on its nuclear plants. london.4:00 on this is "newsday." >> the british parliament has called an emergency debate about the phone hacking scandal surrounding news international. the action has prompted calls for a public inquiry. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians were informed their telephones had been hacked. now a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world hacked her phone while she was missing and some messages have been deleted in the process. david cameron and made his feelings clear cari >> if they are true, this is a dreadful act and a dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite
for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello and welcome to newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> and i'm in london. in military commander in libya has been shot dead by an armed gang. the crisis is put off as politicians wrangle over the country's huge debt. >> the mother of a murdered girl is told her phone was intercepted. officials will meet again in north korea on friday. it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in the london. this is newsday. if we are broadcasting around the world and in the u.s. on pbs. hello and welcome. rebel leaders say their military commander has been shot dead. the head of the council said that general younes was killed by an armed gang. >> for many years, general younes was firmly by gaddafi's side. he was one of the highest profile figures to defect. though he became the man that led the military campaign, that he was never quite trusted by the insurgents. some suspected that his relationship with gaddafi was not completely over found his presently spearheading the efforts to topple the government darfur. he was seen as a trader by tri
the world, this is "newsday"." >> the british prime minister david cameron will make statements to the house of commons later, the start of an all-day debate in the latest developments in the phone hacking scandal. it follows the dramatic testimony on tuesday by rupert murdoch. appearing before m.p.'s, the media tycoon said it was the most humble day of his life but he refused to take personal responsibility for the crisis which engulfs the news world. he appeared before a select committee by his son james. nick robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry,
for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome to newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. i am in london. president obama has warned that a failure to deal with the u.s. debt crisis could cause damage. >> it is a dangerous game that we have never played before and we cannot of -- cannot afford to play it now, not when so many of the jobs are at stake. >> united in their grief, thousands take part in processions across norway to remember the victims of friday's gun and bomb attacks. the u.n. calls for massive action in the horn of africa as the somali ministers warned millions could starve to death. it is a 11:00 a.m. here in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. here in singapore, broadcasting to viewers on pbs and around the world. this is "newsday." president barack obama has warned the republican party that they were playing a dangerous game in the country's approach to resolving its debt crisis. in a live broadcast to the nation, he said the failure to solve the problem with tax increases would damage the economy. he also accused many of his republican opponents of refusing to compromise and
an invitation to ask -- athletes. >> broadcasting to viewers from pbs on america. this is "newsday". hello and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other c
for this to end. >> this is newsday on the bbc. i am in singapore. >> i am in london libya has condemned britain's decision to expel all of colonel khadafy's lipitor -- diplomats after recognizing the transitional council as the libyan government. >> norway has launched an independent inquiry into friday said the attacks. >> let's get more on that story now. thomas edgar was one of the first journalist on the scene after last friday's mass killing on the island. he says police reacted relatively quickly, despite criticism of their response time. >> there seems to be a lot of tension, especially among the journalists. in my opinion, they had two options. one was to wait for the helicopters being scrambled from one of the army bases, which was outside of oslo, then to get a pickup point, load their gear, flight to the island, etc. or they could go directly to the island, which is approximately 35 kilometers outside oslo. what police have been repeatedly saying house -- the last couple of days is that they made the right decision. they just jump in the car and made their way to the island and were
of the people who fled the japanese nuclear disaster zone. >> this is "newsday." hugo chavez of venezuela has addressed cheering supporters from the balcony of the presidential palace. following his return from cuba. he has spent more than three weeks recuperating, up where he underwent emergency surgery. his initial secrecy about his health problems has created uncertainty in venezuela. he addressed the crowd and tried to reassure them. >> i salute from a year. on my personal thanks from so much support to, from so many manifestation of love. love is the best medicine for any illness. thank you from all over the world. >> our correspondent said his return was a complete surprise. >> i do not think anybody where it -- was expecting him back this morning. we had pictures released yesterday showing him recuperating in cuba. no hint that he would be back in the small hours. he arrived in the airport in the pitch darkness. a big surprise to everyone. his supporters were ecstatic to see him back. >> do any now in the studio is our former venezuela correspondent. we will see the pictures of from th
.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london. this is "newsday." >> hello, welcome. the norwegian lawyer asked to defend the killers says that he is probably insane. apparently he believes he was fashioning a war to defend the western world. some of the names of the 76 victims have been published. the latest on the investigation into friday's attacks. >> the official naming of the dead is under way. a shocking reminder that most children were victim -- most victims were children or young adults. among them was a 20-year-old model and talented dancer. the youngest is expected to be just 14. described by the norwegian prime minister as one of the country's most promising young politicians. another talented speaker attempted to escape. 45-year-old monica had run the summer camp for years. this is their self confessed killer. the lawyer defending him describe him as insane. >> the entire case indicates he is insane. he is in a war and he says that the rest of the world does not understand his point of view, but insists that we will all come to understand them. >> he was asked if he showed any remo
to the stars. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome. it is the phone hacking scandal which has stunned britain. today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, "news of the world," is being shut down. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire, which controls 40% of circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the news at the paper that became thoroughly rotted and shocked a nation. in recent weeks, especially in the last few days, the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, has been indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. murdoch's son james believed it could not be amended. >> clearly, certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in, that i believe in, and that this company believes in. this com
and around the world, this is "newsday." >>> hello and welcome. rebel leaders in that libya say their military leader, general younes, has been shot dead. the head of the council said he was killed by an armed gang after he was recalled from the front to appear before a judicial committee. >> for many years, younes was firmly at colonel gaddafi's side. when the conflict broke out in february, he was one of the first high-profile figures to defect. though he became the man who led the note rebels' military against colonel gaddafi, it seems he was never fully trusted by the insurgents. some suggest that his presence spearheading their efforts to topple the government deeply uncomfortable. nor was he ever given by the gaddafi inner circle. either way, his death has come under strange circumstances. the chairman of the national transitional council said that general younes was shot shortly before he was to appear before a judicial committee. an armed gang apparently shot him and to aids. -- and two aides. what bearing his death may have on the conflict is hard to gauge. if the rebel
? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome to newsday on the bbc. the headlines. as the phone hacking crisis escalates, rupert murdoch and his son james prepared to face questions from a u.k. parliamentary committee. gaddafi must go. u.s. officials deliver an uncompromising message to their libyan counterparts in a secret meeting. the eurozone debt crisis worsens. fears for the major banks cause a stock market slump. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton builds bridges on a two- day trip to india. it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting in america and around the world. this is "newsday." the owner of britain's biggest media empire, rupert murdoch, is to make his first appearance before a committee of british members of parliament on tuesday to face questioning about the phone hacking scandal at the "news of the world." his son james will also give evidence, and will the former boss, rebekah brooks. the scandal has already forced two a senior police officers to resign. >> he is ben yates of the are no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, sir paul st
? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome to "newsday," on the bbc. >> the headlines this hour. a warning over the future of the eurozone. the irish prime minister and tax the vatican saying that he was standing by his -- james murdoch claims he did not mislead parliament about the phone hacking allegations. with almost half of somalia's people short of food, the u.n. announces emergency food drops. lucian freud has died. >> it is to i am here in london. you are watching "newsday." leaders of the 17 countries which use the euro have agreed to the terms of a second bailout plan for greece. the greek rescue package will be worth more than $150 billion and there will be billions more from private investors such as banks. >> nearly 10 years ago, the euro had been lost to a fanfare of celebration. they are now facing the greatest test. the leaders came up with a historic package designed to draw a line under the greek debt crisis. the french president and the german chancellor pushed through a rescue plan which amounted to nearly 110 billion euros. the deal not only covers short- term funding but i
their jobs. >> we are broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america and around the world. this is "newsday." >> india's main commercial city has been hit by three coordinated bombings leaving at least 21 people dead and injuring more than 100. the blast is the worst attack since the attack by islamic extremists in 2008. indian officials blamed terrorists for the explosion. >> it was the evening rush hour when the bombs went off. three of them within a quarter of an hour. all of targeted were busy locations. people on their way home from work. one eyewitness said he sought two motorbikes explode in flames and the injured screaming for help. well over 100 people were wounded in what president obama condemned as an outrageous attack. many have lost limbs. >> the blast occurred at about 6:45 p.m. we infer that this was a quarter ended attack by terrorists. >> the first bomb went off at 6:54 at this bizarre. a minute later, the opera house district was attacked. then, a crowded neighborhood at 5 minutes after seven. this is the first major attack in mumbai since 2008, more than 160 people were
.m. in singapore. >> and it is to a.m. here in london. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome paired it is the phone hacking scandal that has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling sunday newspaper "the news of the world" is being shut down by murdoch's news international. the closure comes after a public outcry. but it has not lifted the spot line of the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulations in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. the bbc business editor robert preston starts our coverage. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper which was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual, by all means. but you cannot forget. >> he may have well have made the remarks about the newspaper that has shocked us here in the paper that has been printed for 168 years became indelibly linked with the worst practices in british journalism. mr. murdoch says it could not be amended. >> clearly practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and t
. this is "newsday." >> the british parliament has called a rare debate about the phone hacking scandal. one of its newspapers, the news of the world, is said to have paid a private detective to hack into the mobile phone of a missing teenage girl who was later found murdered. the action has prompted calls for a public inquiry. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing, as more and more celebrities and politicians were informed their phones had been hacked. but now a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old myly went missing in twoufment her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world hacked into her phone while she was missing and that some messages may even have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who's on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shocking, that someone could do this, actually knowing that the police were trying to find this person and trying to find out what had happen
. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome to newsday on the bbc. i'm in singapore. the headlines this hour, arwin $150 billion for greece, but will it be enough to save the euro? the u.n. and ounces of emergency drops. and hillary clinton joined the quest to move forward on tough security issues. and the artist lucian freud has died. it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore and 4:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting to view -- viewers on pbs in america and around the world. this is "neuza de." -- "newsday." >> hello and welcome. of leaders of the 17 countries which use the euro have agreed to a second bailout for greece and preventive measures to prevent the debt crisis from spreading. the greek package will be worth an estimated $150 billion. and there will be billions more from private investors, such as banks. from brussels, gavin reports. >> nearly 10 years ago, the bureau has -- had been launched to a fanfare of celebration. it is now facing its greatest task. and today, europe's leaders came up with an historic package designed to draw a line under the greek
investigation. in metropolitan police were present of said only that inquiries were continuing. newsday," watching " from the bbc. still to come, we have a special report from japan. as people try to rebuild their lives following the earthquake and tsunami. the duke and duchess of cambridge are making a splash in canada. 14 million pound appeal has been pledged for the horn of africa. 9 million people are at risk of malnutrition. this is the worst drought in 60 years which has affected somalia, kenya, and other countries. >> this is a place where life hangs in the balance every single day. july, 2011, and once again this corner of africa is cursed, teetering on the brink of disaster. this doctor is fighting a constant battle to save life here and he does not always win. >> this is becoming very bad. you can hold a child and they will just die in your hands. you can see the life slipping through your fingers. you can console the mother, you tell the mother what has happened, you do the best. >> to escape this drought, hungry, desperate people are pouring into the refugee camp, already th
.m. in london. broadcasting to viewers in the u.k. and around the world, this is newsday. >> hello and welcome. here in the u.k., lawyers for the relatives of british soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan say police have warned their clients that their phones may have been hacked into by the news of the world. the tabloid newspaper at the center of a phone hacking scandal. the parent company, news corporation, said it would be absolutely appalled and horrified if the allegations proved true. and the owner, rupert murdoch, has ordered full cooperation with police investigations. our political editor nick robinson reports. >> yes, there was even worse to come. the relatives of soldiers kill in iraq and afghanistan have been warned that their phones may have been hacked. according to tomorrow's daily telegraph. they joined the families of those whose loved ones were blown apart on 7-7. >> my mind went back to 2005. and the real emotional turmoil and state that we were in. and that somebody was listening to them. it's a violation, isn't it? >> also on the list of possible targets, the parents of
for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> welcome to newsday on the bbc. >> the headlines this hour. " indian officials blamed terrorists for three explosions in mumbai that killed 21 people and injured dozens more. the building is condemned by the white house and -- actions condemned by the white house and the u.n.. >> the hacking scandal forces rupert murdoch to abandon his bid for b sky b. and key demand for protectors. >> it is 11:00 a.m. in singapore. >> it is 4:00 a.m. in london broadcasting in the u.s. on pbs and are run the world. this is newsday. >> in its main commercial city, mumbai has been hit by three coordinated bombings, leaving 21 people dead and hundreds more injured. it is the first attack since the islamic extremist attack in 2008. >> it was the evening rush hour when the bombs went off. three of them within 15 minutes. all targeted busy locations at a busy time of day. many people were on their way home from work. one eyewitness said he saw to duck -- two motorbike to explode in flames and the injured screaming for help. well over 100 people wounded in what pres
, "bbc world news." >> welcome to "newsday" on the bbc. we're in singapore and london. the headlines. the crisis escalates as another top policeman resigns, man from "news of the world" is found dead. >> the mcenroe zone debt crisis worsens. the major banks prompt a stock market slump. and forcing a closer alliance, hillary clinton builds bridges on a two-day trip to india. it's 9:00 oom here in singapore. >> it's 2:00 a.m. here in london broadcasting to viewers on pbs in america and around the world, this is "news day." >> a second senior british police officer has resigned in connection with the scandal over phone hacking and alleged corruption in rupert murdoch's newspaper empire. police commissioner john yates said he had been i don't think in 2009 not to reopen an investigation into the affair, but had acted with complete integrity. meanwhile, the journalist who first claimed that andy knew about alleged malpractices at the "news of the world" has been found dead at his home. >> he is yates of the yard no longer, resigning just a day after his boss, the commissioner of the metro
on pbs in america and around the world. this is newsday. >> the chinese communist party is celebrating its 90th anniversary. the world's largest political party with a membership of more than 18 million. and it's managed to stay in power elsewhere have been pushed aside. our correspondent, michael bristow, traveled to the city of yen-on in northern china. the communist base during the civil war more than 60 years ago and considered by many as a birthplace of china's communist revolution. >> the communists like to celebrate their victory. they do it twice a day. there's courage in sacrifice but most of it on one side. they see a partial version of history with a clear message. mao tse-tung's party saved the country. this propaganda is fed to the young, they love the party even before they're old enough to understand why. where here to remember the party's great achievement. those achievements aren't hard to find. ness a remote place, a long way from the booming coastal cities that are driving china's economy. but even here, there's wealth. the party, process tarot along this valley and
sea. >> broadcasting on pbs in america and around that the world, this is " newsday." >>> hello, and welcome. and the u.k., lawyers for the relatives of british soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan say the police have warned their clients their funds may have been hacked into by the news of the world, the tabloid newspaper at the center of a hacking scandal. news corp. said it would be absolutely appalled and horrified if the allegations prove true. its owner, rupert murdoch, has ordered full cooperation with the police investigation. >> yes, there was even worse to come. the relatives of soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan have been warned their funds may have been hacked. they joined the families of those whose loved ones were blown apart on 7/7. >> my mind went back to 2005 and the emotional turmoil that we were in. and that somebody was listening to that, it is a violation. >> also on the list of possible targets, the parents of wholey and jessica. and of course, the parents of those who were given false hope that she was still alive when her voice messages were delet
to the complexity of this crisis. >> you are watching newsday on the bbc live from singapore and london. still to come, the latest from northern ireland, where police officers are trying to restore order after riots broke out in belfast. >> rejecting claims of buying his way to host the world football cup in 2022. thousands of people in bosnia have attended a ceremony marking the 16th anniversary of the massacre of a nelson muslims. the remains of more than 600 victims were recovered from mass graves. >> 16 years on, but the pain is just as rockaw. a mother overwhelmed with anguish at finding remains of her son. at 29 years old, he was one of those killed back in 1995. today, just another coffin lowered into the ground. over 600 were buried on this anniversary, identified through dna analysis. for those grievinghusbands, it t atrocity in europe since the second world war. thousands of muslims crowded into the safe haven as the war raged on. the men and boys were let off to be slaughtered, or around 8000 of them within the space of five days. it is the only part of the balkan wars to be labeled
in the weeks and days to come. >> this is "newsday," on the bbc. >> the headlines for you. david cameron has defended his integrity during a special session of parliament. >> the irish prime minister has accused the roman catholic hierarchy of putting the power and reputation of the church ahead of child rape victims. in tokyo, the verdict is expected on thursday and the trial of a man accused of murdering a british woman who had been teaching english in japan. he confessed to raping and killing her but said that the death was accidental. this case has been very high profile. people are watching the verdict? >> yes, they are. there was dozens of photographers and power crews waiting to see the family of the accused. they were expecting to get the verdict that they hoped for. during the verdict, the suspect confessed that he raped the woman. he said he was responsible for her death but the defense said that he suffocated her accidently while trying to stop her crying out and he tried to revive her. the prosecution is pushing for a murder victim of -- murder verdict. >> and more than two year
of being on the payroll of pakistan's spy agency. >> you're watching "newsday" on the bbc live. still to come on the program with, the london olympics exactly a year away, we look at how beijing has benefited from the game's legacy. >> and amy winehouse's father leads the tributes to his angel daughter, as family and friends attend the singer's funeral. >> e7bs of thousands of people have been -- 2e7bs of thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes after a tropical storm. at least nine people have thought to have died and many more are missing. >> shelter from the storm. she's safe now, rescued from the floods that have hit the philippines. but there are many more. villages and towns underwater. half a million people here have been affected. these are the worst floods in this region for years. once these were streets. but look at them now. getting through this to safety is a difficult journey. these people never had much. now they just have what they can carry with them. the governments launched a major rescue operation. these boats are the only way to reach those strande
distracted a female shopper the newsday sharp object -- and then used a sharp object to cut the victims bottom. in yesterday's attack, the suspect in selected at 1.5-inch cut that slice of the victims denim shorts. he was long gone before help arrived. >> authorities believe the suspect has hit at least five times since february at three area shopping centers. >> i try to be very aware of my surroundings. >> she lives near this marshals in chantilly. >> i do not understand why he would do that. what do you get from that? >> if you recognize the man you are urged to contact authorities immediately. they also believe investigators believe that there could be more victims out there. they certainly would like for them to contact them. >>> we're following a developing story. the washington post is reporting that al qaeda may be on the brink of collapse. this revelation comes about three months after the death of osama bin laden. officials say that his death was a critical turning point. the report cites continuous attacks by drawing air attacks -- by a drop in air attacks. >>> there are more
. viewersoadcasting to around the world. this is "newsday." ♪ >> late night talks between the french president and german chancellor have reportedly resulted in a joint position over new bailouts for greece. an emergency summit of european leaders will begin to discuss the crisis in a few hours. it comes amid warnings that the currency is facing its greatest test to date. >> for the past year or more, whenever european leaders of that, there has been one issue at the top of the agenda again and again. that is trying to fix the euro. the survival of a single currency has been called into question. there are increasingly urgent appears for eurozone leaders to act decisively. >> they have said they will do what it takes to ensure the stability of the currency. now is the time to make good on the promise. >> all eyes are on the biggest countries -- france and germany. how much more will be spent to help solve the sovereign debt crisis? the eurozone cannot take much more uncertainty. three countries have already been bailed out. greece, ireland, and portugal. greece needs a second bailout. if a dea
hamill. he's a new york newspaper icon, worked for the new york post, village voice, newsday, new york magazine, and esquire. and he's in his spare time written 11 novels. the latest is called "tabloid city." what are the odds? he believes, if this kind of activity was going on in a news room, he believes someone beyond the street level reporters, had to know. so when i spoke to pete hamill, i asked him, who? >> i know that the editors i worked for, if you came to them and said, look, i got this spook. you hire him, he can get into any mailbox in new york. this is before the internet. >> i've got a special spy, sort of a secret agent, in effect. >> he can open the mailbox. he can take the mail out. he can heat them so that you can read the contents. he can seal them. >> if you want to one of your editors and said, i've got a guy that can do the very thing they're doing over in britain, what would have happened. the editor would have said, what do you think about that? let's do it. let's start with this. i've got a better idea. give me your press card. give me your keys. go down the hal
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